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sully-s:

A Anon asked me for some pointers on how to draw in my style today. I didn’t really know how to write pointers so I thought I would attempt a very minimal tutorial.

(via tella1985)

stringbing:

I did a demo and showed a certain pipeline in Adobe Flash and After Effects to a few folks. The tie downs for this one is really bad since I had to rush it. No model sheet was used, I basically just improvised for this one - so you’ll notice the character changing all the time. I decided to go with a “cowboy during a duel” excercise for this one.
1. Rough Pass - Rough poses with select breakdowns
2. Tie down - Tied down drawings with inbetween
3. Color - Color and after effects

(via bonkalore)

pigeonbits:

Color palette tutorial time!

This is by no means the Only Way To Pick Colors—it’s just a relatively-simple method I use sometimes.  I’ve found it works pretty well, almost regardless of what colors you pick—as long as you can keep them organized by those light/dark warm/cool categories, and make sure one category takes up a significantly higher proportion of page space, it usually turns out pretty good!

(via crane-machine)

pillowbedhead:

thehiirablog:

Kind of a little random (probably incorrect) guide to basic sorts of shading-
I also forgot flat shading which is no shading or highlighting at all

But here’s something to ah… look at I guess.

Holy shit

(via thylionheart)

hammpix:

Folks welcomed the hand reference I posted, so here’s some foot reference.

As an artist you’ll draw A LOT of feet, especially feet that REST ON THE GROUND. Don’t be one of those artists who hides feet behind grass or mist all the time. Print these out and draw ‘em.

I included the knees because you’ll need to know how feet connect with legs; draw ‘em up to the knee.

(via blurbery)

jothezette:

Some more advice that I have no right to give.  I’m serious about the Stephen Silver advice though- he’s the man.

(via fluffyfuzzball)

dota-with-dusk:

lexxerduglas:

pheberoni:

yeha

holy bUTTS WHAT A GOOD IDEA??

scratchmarksrhino

(via asstrouge)

loish:

process of this piece

(via sugarlantern)

heffydoodle:

mbt1991:

mrcontro:

qinni:

The whole film took me altogether about 5 grueling months (usually 10-12hours a day) to do. I often felt my butt was going to grow into the chair I usually sat at. 

Please note that this was simply my way of doing my film to achieve the soft-shaded style I wanted; there are many other ways of doing this and some are a lot faster with different results~! :)

This tut differs a bit from my dA version, because tumblr lets me put the combination of gifs and jpegs :D. 

Here’s a book that will really help you start animating:


here’s some books that are good for composition, storytelling and colours:


I hope these helped

I ask that no one removes the credit or source for this tutorial/guide please. thanks :)

And this is a keeper!  No doubt about that!  :)

I’m just gonna put this one on standby

for when I start my senior film!

(via hippofoliage)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK! — Silhouette

This week only, I will post a tip everyday. Send me a personal message if you have any requests or ideas. Have  a great week!

Norm

(via bonkalore)

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L

(via hippofoliage)

thecharmm:

Here’s a quick look at what my process looks like nowadays! I really only use the default pen settings in sai and the air brush for most of my coloring. Once everything’s merged, I use this brush:

to fix up some shapes which I definitely see better once all the colors are laid out. As for color palettes/theory, that’s still something I’m figuring out for myself, but don’t be afraid to rely on photos/pre-existing color palettes to test the waters!

jebbyfish:

So you want to make an OC?: A Masterpost of Ways to Create, Develop, and Make Good OCs!

i made this masterpost in hopes that it helps you in making your own OCs ah;; it can also apply to developing RP characters i suppose! if you’d like to add more resources then go for it sugar pea (´ヮ`)!

How to Write Better OCs:

Character Development:

Diversity

Villains

Relationships

ARCHETYPES

NAMES

APPEARANCE

DETAILS

again, this is to help inspire you or help establish your OCs! i hope you get a lot of info and help from this ahh ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ

(Source: herorosalyn, via rudy--steiner)

whethervane:

kanotynes:

btw If you really do want to learn to animate, don’t follow my advice just read this: http://www.scribd.com/doc/5445343/the-animators-survival-kit-richard-williams

HOLY SHITTTTT A PDF OF THE ENTIRE GODDAMN BOOK!!!! EVERYONE WHO WANTS TO LEARN TO ANIMATE SHOULD READ THIS

(via bonkalore)

nikaalexandra:

hello! hey! quick psa!

when mixing skin tones, always mix in lighter and darker complimentary or analogous colors (such as pinks, reds, and purples) to change value, don’t just add black or white to change a value

this way you get a real nice looking palette likeimage

instead of a dead looking palette likeimage

unless you’re going for dead, in which case carry on 

(via sugarlantern)